Books You'd Want During A 3-Hour Layover & Best TV Characters to Join After Season One

From the depths comes another lost JJPE episode! Recorded months ago, these questions were asked! How did James almost die MULTIPLE times as a lad? Who would lead a super superteam? What might cause the boys to give up bread forever? Listen and learn! Oh, yeah, and then some stuff about books and TV. Whateva.

James deserved to die.

Underrated Matthew McConaughey Performances & Best Uses of Time Travel in Pop Culture

AKA The McConaughcaust! See how Matthew McConaughey nearly ends the JJPE forever! Thrill at furhter adventures into the treacherous planet (with the most beautiful flowers!) Inaster! Also hear the boys talk about time travel! So much content! So little context! Listen up, buttercup!

Alright alright alright…

Roseanne Season 1 Highlights

Roseanne Season 2 Highlights:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0YjapDztDjw

Genevieve Koski of The AV Club on Roseanne: 

Roseanne shouldn’t have worked. When it debuted in 1988, the family-sitcom landscape was dominated by the middle-to-upper class—your Cosbys, your Seavers, your Micelli-Bowers…Furthermore, it centered on a brash, opinionated woman with a grating voice and a body type that was unusual for television, then and now.

But the show was a hit out of the gate…Roseanne’s success further emboldened Barr and her writers (whose ranks included Joss Whedon and Amy Sherman-Palladino, among other notables), who used the Conner family to tell the sorts of stories that weren’t often being told on sitcoms, at least not in the ’80s. In addition to storylines informed by Barr’s feminist stance and facilitated by a cast with two teenage girls—featuring issues like birth control, menstruation, PMS, and teenage sex—the show was and remains one of very few successful sitcoms to engage, routinely and enthusiastically, with the struggles of the working class. Because of its propensity, particularly later in the series, for memorable, issue-driven episodes, Roseanne is often remembered most for its aggressive promotion of its star’s pet concerns (which were never particularly consistent), but informing all of that were the twin pillars of Roseanne, the two major concerns that dictated everything the Conners did: family and money.

Based in the fictional factory town of Lanford, Illinois, Roseanne concerns a nuclear family rotating around the titular force of nature at its center. While Barr is undeniably the loudly beating heart of the show—so much so that producers’ efforts to remove her when she became problematic proved futile—the rest of the Conner clan are its other vital organs: John Goodman as dad Dan, Laurie Metcalf as ever-present sister Jackie, Lecy Goranson (and later her replacement, Sarah Chalke) as older sister Becky, Sara Gilbert as middle child Darlene, and Michael Fishman as youngest son DJ. (Okay, DJ isn’t exactly vital; let’s call him the show’s spleen.) The manner in which the Conners snipe at and mess with each other has earned Roseanne a reputation for mean-spiritedness, but the family members’ loyalty to and twisted affection for one another are evident throughout the series, particularly in the early seasons. The Conners are very much the sort of people who laugh to keep from crying, and their dark, cynical worldview is both a symptom of and a salve for the indignities they face as a blue-collar, moderately educated family just trying to get by.

But while other series that earn the “blue-collar” designation typically settle for placing their breadwinners in menial jobs that are nonetheless stable and profitable enough to keep the family-sitcom wheels greased, Roseanne put both Dan and Roseanne through a grind of unrewarding and erratic employment that frequently left them on the cusp of poverty. Things smoothed out for the family, occupation-wise, around the series’ midpoint, as Roseanne opened a restaurant and Dan earned a stable job working for the city, but thanks to the foundation laid in those early seasons, the show never abandoned the idea that its central family could lose it all at any time.

Source:  http://www.avclub.com/article/10-episodes-that-show-the-heart-and-soul-behind-ir-91158

If there’s one thing you need to learn before the summer’s end, it’s this: there is a difference between black raspberries and blackberries. Don’t let people tell you otherwise (they’re probably just trying to rob you of your black raspberries, and can’t be trusted). Blackberries are one thing, raspberries are another, and black raspberries are a whole other kind of berry.

Here’s what you need to know:

  • The easiest way to tell the difference between the two is by the core, where the stem attaches to the berry. Blackberries will always have a white core, whereas black raspberries are hollow in the center (just like raspberries).
  • Black raspberries are a small, black-colored raspberry covered with very small hairs (much like a raspberry). Blackberries are usually larger, with bigger “cells.”
  • Blackberries are sometimes described as shinier than black raspberries.
  • Black raspberries are harvested earlier than blackberries, and can also handle the cold better.
  • Black raspberries are said to be less tart than blackberries, making them better for eating fresh (though they also make great jams). Blackberries, which can sometimes be rather sour, are great berries for making dessert.

Now that you are berry educated, take advantage of the season and eat lots of berries (black, red or otherwise).

Source:  http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/07/25/blackberry-black-raspberry-difference_n_3652357.html

We have often spoken about the awesome female characters of George R. R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire, and they play an especially large part in this episode.  Here we have Martin discussing why he’s so good as writing female characters in his own words.

So how does he get inside the head of, say, his teenage characters? ‘Yes, you’re right I’ve never been an eight year old girl,’ he says, ‘but I’ve also never been an exiled princess, or a dwarf or bastard. What I have been is human. I just write human characters.’
He gets plenty of feedback from his fans. ‘Some women hate the female characters,’ he says. ‘But importantly they hate them as people, because of things that they’ve done, not because the character is underdeveloped.’ The pitfalls of lots of other fantasy texts, he says is when writers stray into writing in sterotypes. But because Martin has a sprawling world with thousands of characters (and five books to do it in), he has the luxury of developing each one fully. ‘Male or female, I believe in painting in shades of grey,’ he says. ‘All of the characters should be flawed; they should all have good and bad, because that’s what I see. Yes, it’s fantasy, but the characters still need to be real.’
‘I regard men and women as all human - yes there are differences, but many of those differences are created by the culture that we live in, whether it’s the medieval culture of Westeros, or 21st century western culture.’ 
Source: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/women/womens-life/9959063/Game-of-Throness-George-RR-Martin-Im-a-feminist.html

We have often spoken about the awesome female characters of George R. R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire, and they play an especially large part in this episode.  Here we have Martin discussing why he’s so good as writing female characters in his own words.

So how does he get inside the head of, say, his teenage characters? ‘Yes, you’re right I’ve never been an eight year old girl,’ he says, ‘but I’ve also never been an exiled princess, or a dwarf or bastard. What I have been is human. I just write human characters.’

He gets plenty of feedback from his fans. ‘Some women hate the female characters,’ he says. ‘But importantly they hate them as people, because of things that they’ve done, not because the character is underdeveloped.’ The pitfalls of lots of other fantasy texts, he says is when writers stray into writing in sterotypes. But because Martin has a sprawling world with thousands of characters (and five books to do it in), he has the luxury of developing each one fully. ‘Male or female, I believe in painting in shades of grey,’ he says. ‘All of the characters should be flawed; they should all have good and bad, because that’s what I see. Yes, it’s fantasy, but the characters still need to be real.’

‘I regard men and women as all human - yes there are differences, but many of those differences are created by the culture that we live in, whether it’s the medieval culture of Westeros, or 21st century western culture.’

Source: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/women/womens-life/9959063/Game-of-Throness-George-RR-Martin-Im-a-feminist.html

Best/Most Complex Female Fictional Characters

In this episode the show is brought to a screaming halt…by laughter! Not anger! Not violence! Not Adam not really listening to James! Joy! Mirth! Smiles! What could bring about such jubilation? Listen and find out, Extravaganzers!

Oh, and we also talk about our Best/Most Complex Female Fictional Characters. Woohoo!

Lush vegetation.

We talked about Mark Z. Danielewski’s novel House of Leaves and we also talked about his sister Poe and her pop song that included an excerpt from Mark’s novel.  What we didn’t get into is how crucial Poe was to securing Mark’s literary career.  From her Wikipedia:

In 1997, Poe sent a manuscript of her brother’s first novel “House of Leaves" to Warren Frazier, who was a college friend of hers and who had become an agent at John Hawkins Literary Agency in New York. Warren agreed to represent Mark and eventually secured a publishing deal for Mark at Pantheon Books. In 2000, Pantheon published “House of Leaves,” releasing it to coincide with the release of Poe’s second album “Haunted.” Poe then invited Mark to do a spoken word passage in her “Drive By 2001” remix of the song “Hey Pretty” and also invited him to perform this passage in both her video and live show opening for Depeche Mode.Of his sister’s support, Mark recounts how he once, in a moment of rage, tore the handwritten manuscript of a story called “Redwood” into tiny pieces and threw it into a dumpster and that Poe had gone out to that dumpster and taped the entire manuscript back together. It took her two weeks.

We talked about the awesome author Roald Dahl.  He did in fact write the movie’s screenplay, and received credit on the final poster, but he had serious problems with the casting and intended tone of the film.  As a result, much of the screenplay was given an uncredited rewrite by David Seltzer.

He was the author of some of my favorite books of childhood, including Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Matilda, James and the Giant Peach, and The Witches.

More Star Trek talk: 

We revisited these skants and talked about the smelly season 1 TNG uniforms.  I’ve also included a master comparison of all Star Trek uniforms.

Also, here’s an Empire story about the evolution of the uniforms:  http://www.empireonline.com/features/evolution-star-trek-costumes

We talked about this person and event during the episode, when Jury Duty came up.  I remember this happening, since I live in Arkansas, and then it was covered more fully in the documentary Trekkies.  I knew that she answered, “I always wear my uniform to formal occasions” when asked why she was wearing the uniform.  But I wasn’t sure which trial it was for specifically.  Whitewater?  O.J. Simpson?  Watergate?  Lots of options.

The media ate this up, mostly because it gave them the excuse to come up with headlines like the following:

Judge Beams ‘Trekkie’ Juror from Whitewater Case
Space cadet juror keeps on Trekking
In this courtroom, no space for a Star Trek Juror